Boston University honors Hollis, Social Justice Advocate/Educator

Posted by on Sep 8, 2022 in bullying, Discrimination, Uncategorized, workplace bullying

Boston University honors Hollis, Social Justice Advocate/Educator   Boston University honors Hollis, Social Justice Advocate/Educator   Boston University honors Hollis, Social Justice Advocate/Educator Dr. Leah P. Hollis, a Boston University, Martin Luther King Jr Fellow for Social Justice, has been awarded the Lucy Wheelock Alumni Award for 2022. Specifically, the Boston University/Wheelock alumni network honors Hollis for “championing causes such as workplace bullying, discrimination, pay inequity, and gender bias.” Many of her colleagues comment that Hollis’ advocacy inspired the historic 9% raise for faculty and the introduction of more substantial pay bumps as the point of tenure and promotion. Boston University Professor and Dean Emeritus, Dr. Hardin Coleman stated, “it is impressive they way in which Dr, Hollis uses her research and practical experience to effect real change in the world that often benefits the most vulnerable.” Hollis’s  efforts align with the Morgan State core values of excellence, integrity, respect, diversity, innovation, and leadership. Therefore, she is a recent awardee of the Dr. Iva G Jones award, the highest award bestowed on faculty at Morgan State University for research, teaching, services, and character. Hollis has dedicated her academic research to workplace bullying and specifically how bullying disproportionately affects women and people of color.   Her research informs her Social Justice course which won an award from AERA (American Educational Research Association). Hollis has penned over 50 articles and worked with over 300 colleges and universities to curtail costly and health-harming workplace bullying on campus.  In the last year, she has completed two books with Routledge, Human Resource Perspectives on Workplace Bullying in Higher Education Understanding Vulnerable Employees’ Experiences (2021) and Black Women, Intersectionality, and Workplace Bullying Intersecting Distress(2022).  Hollis continues to work through her consulting group, Patricia Berkly...

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Lecture on ECO System on Workplace bullying- OCT 27. 2pm EST. Boston University

Posted by on Oct 16, 2021 in bullying, Discrimination, Diversity Training

  Center for Character and Social Responsibility Occasional Seminar Series (free event) 2:00– 3:30 PM October 27, 2021 People, Places, Things: A comprehensive eco system model of workplace bullying in higher education     Leah P. Hollis, Ed.D Associate Professor of Advanced Studies, Leadership, and Policy College of Education and Urban Studies Morgan State University Senior Scholar Center for Character and Social Responsibility   Join Zoom Meeting https://bostonu.zoom.us/j/96901537734?pwd=cENKS2dPbWJLOEFkdVIwMmdMSzZqUT09&from=addon In the past decade, several scholars have examined the antecedents and causes of workplace bullying. We have examined the psychological position of the bully, the involvement of leadership, and potential health problems. However, it appears to date there has not been a study that exams the ECO system of workplace bullying, that is how do all these elements work together to create hostile work environments in higher education that support bullying.  Therefore, this lecture will offer an Eco system of workplace bullying in higher education, which is the result of 18 in-depth interviews with faculty.  Not only will this lecture present the findings of the extended case study and resulting model, but we will also garner feedback from participants that may contribute to a future integration of the model. Leah P. Hollis Ed.D., Associate Professor at Morgan State is a noted national and international expert on workplace bullying. Her recent book, Human Resource Perspectives on Workplace Bullying in Higher Education Understanding Vulnerable Employees’ Experiences was released by Routledge Publishers in May 2021.  It empirically examines the structural and organizational problems that sustain workplace bullying and hurt junior faculty, women, people of color, and the LGBTQ community. Other notable work includes The Coercive Community College: Bullying and its Costly Impact on the Mission to Serve Underrepresented Populations, which was released by Emerald publications in 2016.    ...

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Miami University & Metropolitan State

Posted by on Mar 18, 2019 in bullying, Discrimination, workplace bullying

Dr. Hollis was out again this winter spreading the word about workplace bullying in higher education. First, she visited Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. Her two day trip included a training for the School of Education, and the second day she participated on a panel for the Psychology Department. This March 2019, Dr. Hollis visited Metropolitan State in St. Paul, MN. Her keynote talk for the faculty reflected on how workplace bullying hurts diversity. She also gave some solutions on how leaders can stamp out abusive bullying behaviors. If you would like Dr. Hollis to visit your campus, contact us directly. Time is overdue to STOP! workplace bullying on...

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Is there Justice for GI Jane

Posted by on Jun 30, 2013 in Discrimination, Diversity Training, sexual harassment

Is There Justice For GI Jane? Is there Justice for GI Jane? Is there Justice for GI Jane? Do you remember the hardships Demi Moore’s character went through to become the first woman to join Navy Special Forces in the 1997 film GI Jane? The torment, the sacrifice and the even the frustration any woman endures to measure up to men in a men’s world should be enough to equalize that system on and off the field of battle for women. Imagine further, that after such dedicated service, GI Jane and another 26,000 of her fellow service women face sexual assault while serving in the military. Often such assault goes unreported and unpunished, leaving the question, is there justice for GI Jane? While GI Jane was fictitious, the pervasive level of sexual assault in the service is not. Unfortunately as Face The Nation* reports, a culture of power in the military leads to the pervasive abuse of women serving our country. In the current system, the commander oversees such complaints; yet this can lead to conflicts of interest or lax oversight, especially if the commander is party to the complaint. In civilian workplaces, employees are protected from retaliation when they voice concerns for civil rights as outlined in Title VII legislation. Also, in civilian workplaces, employees can access a third-party in the EEOC and the court system if they don’t find justice internally with Human Resources. However, it appears that the power structures in the military jeopardize this very right for women. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, a Democrat from New York, has proposed legislation that takes the adjudication process out of the hands of commanders and instead brings such cases to a military board outside the chain of command. She also reminded the senate that countries like the United Kingdom and Israel have already taken such steps to protect their service women. The military reports that 97% of its service men and women go through sexual harassment prevention training. Another 9 out of 10 state they would encourage women to report such abuse. Then why do 26,000 women face sexual assault? As with any organization which subscribes to power structures as part of its management structure, when power is abused, those at the bottom of the food chain are the ones to endure such abuse. This is not commentary on how the military should run its leadership training or functions, but it is a reflection on how the misuse of power corrupts. Whether military or civilian leadership, whether it is about abuse, assault, bullying or other corruption of power, it is leadership at the helm that sets the tone, who serves as the architect of the organizational culture. *SOURCE: CBS News...

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Fall In Love With Work Again

Posted by on Feb 23, 2013 in Discrimination, Diversity Training

Fall In Love With Work Again Fall In Love With Work Again Fall In Love With Work Again   You will spend more waking hours on the job than you will with family and friends. It is no surprise that people who have stressful and toxic work environments have higher rates of hypertension, diabetes, depression and other stress related ailments. In the unsettled economy of the last five years, the workplace has at times become a tense place for employers and employees.  Discrimination and harassment cases remain at heightened levels, with close to 100,000 new complaints with the EEOC each of the last three years. Various state legislators are striving to pass healthy workplace laws to protect people from harassment/bullying who are not afforded protections under the Title VII Civil Rights Act of 1964. With all of this strife, how can we get back to loving the thing we do? How do we create and maintain a healthy workplace as an individual?  Dr. Leah Hollis of Patricia Berkly LLC offers a few strategies to help you fall in love again with the job. Know the employee manual.  So often employees simply sign off on the employee manual without reading it.  Each company has a different set of policies regarding sick time, lunch, harassment, retaliation or even payroll. Know the rules of your organization and follow them. Don’t be a bad actor.  Even if you have a case of harassment, discrimination or bullying, the minute you stoop to the level of the bully or harasser you have become a “bad actor.”  The bad actor is categorized as being a ‘hot head,’ unreliable, or simply a colleague who is not behaving in a manner that the organization can support. Just because someone else is acting out, it is not an invitation to drop the “f- bomb” as well. Bad actors seldom prosper. Do your job.  The reason we are all on the job is to produce for the employer.  Excessive undocumented time off, constant mistakes, fraud, favoritism and other performance issues can be grounds for action.  If there is a group of similarly situated employees who have performance issues, and they are treated differently in response to the same infractions, there can be a legal issue for the employer.  However, doing the job well and being an excellent performer strengthens anyone’s credibility. Know the structure of your organization.  Be sure to make connections from the janitor all the way through to the vice president.  People should know you and your strengths before there is a problem.  And, you should know how to seek reliable information. Stay positive.  No one wants to work with “Negative Nelly.”  Stay positive without barking orders, acting out or demeaning people.  Again likeability across the organization is key.  Such positive energy can help you stay focused on your options and also bring you support in the midst...

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Don’t Be Afraid of the Office Bully Monster

Posted by on Nov 10, 2012 in bullying, cyberbullying, Discrimination

Don’t Be Afraid of the Office Bully Monster Don’t Be Afraid of the Office Bully Monster Don’t Be Afraid of the Office Bully Monster Originally posted on JENNINGS WIRE   We are entering that cherished time of they year… Halloween moving through Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years is a time where office parties and progressively bad behavior seem to be overlooked underneath the haze of holiday cheer. There is nothing like spiked apple cider, rum cake and that mysterious red punch at the party to make colleague and supervisor overlook their better senses. Employees who are new to their career might find this to be an invitation to join in the “reindeer games,” without considering the consequences when they sober up the next day.  Take a page from Lance, the new assistant director who got a bit comfortable with his boss at a party. With the apple bob at lunch and spicy cider mixture that somehow got spiked, the office staff was at ease in an environment that was typically tense and rigid.  Lance was thrilled with the holiday cheer as his first year under his boss, Artie, was less than something to celebrate.  Lance noticed that the rest of the staff was at ease too, maybe this was the end to the yelling and manipulative behavior that had been the norm for his department.  Maybe Lance could finally relax. Artie and Lance had a chance to chat over the apple cider. Artie had let his hair down, discussed his own insecurities with upper management and with a buzz, confided in Lance about fears of losing respect at the top.  Lance felt comfortable and joined in, sharing his own insecurities with his low grade point average in college, feeling unaccomplished with his quest of grad school, and his lack luster relationship with on-again-off-again girlfriend.  For about 90 minutes, though induced by alcohol, they were civil human beings for a change.  As the office party came to an end, the staff took their last nibbles at cookies and caramel corn, then returned to a relatively productive afternoon on the job.  All seemed well. The next day, Lance reported to work to find that things were “back to normal.”  No one made eye contact with each other.  There was a muffled tirade coming from Artie’s office. As Lance settled in, his cube mate remarked, “ the ogre is back…!” Artie quickly came around the corner and berated Lance for being 15 minutes late.  He reminded Lance that “this is why he couldn’t make the cut in grad school…” and that “… no woman would stick with him given his tardiness..”  Lance was demoralized.  All the things he had shared over spiced cider was coming back to haunt him publically.  He was powerless to respond, and saw no relief from the terror which returned to the office. Lance was caught in what...

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